Reading to Write: Part II

Photo from the Vanderbilt Writing Studio. The original caption reads: "Reverse Outlining can be a sticky (note) situation" http://www.flickr.com/photos/vandywritingstudio

Photo from the Vanderbilt Writing Studio. The original caption reads: “Reverse Outlining can be a sticky (note) situation”
http://www.flickr.com/photos/vandywritingstudio

A follow-up post on techniques for teaching writing by first teaching critical reading. In particular, I talk about reverse outlining: how to do it, why you might assign it, and some thought on its relationship to developing critical reading skills.

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Reading to Write: Part I

StrathernTech&Kinship0112Teaching adult learners to write well means first teaching them to read well. “Reading to Write” is the first of two posts on how I’ve attempted to get students reading well in order that they might identify what they need to do to write well.

 

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Professionalization: A Formula for Anxiety?

Anne-Elise Coste, "Professionalization is killing art" (2008) I first misread this as: "Professionalization is a killing art," which, really, is just somehow so much more poignant.

Anne-Elise Coste, “Professionalization is killing art” (2008)
I first misread this as: “Professionalization is a killing art,” which, really, is just somehow so much more poignant.

 

(R) is for Risk; (A) is for Anxiety: A new blog post on PhD professionalization, quantitative risk assessment, and what the two have to do with graduate-student anxiety.

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Teaching Criticism

from the "English Grad Student Shaming" tumblr.

“What Mom always said doesn’t go far in grad school…” (from EnglishGradStudentShaming.tumblr.com)

This post attempts to puzzle through the impulse to critique and criticize in literary studies; in particular, it considers a grad-student culture of shame via the newly-created tumblr “englishgradstudentshaming.” What happens when grad students and instructors feel like they “can’t say anything nice about books anymore”?

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Cultures of Criticism

Cultures of CriticismThe thinking behind this post began with some of the work done at The Thesis Whisperer– an insightful and immensely readable blog and resource for grad students. Dr. Inger Mewburn’s post about the “chameleon” reaction to criticism got me thinking: how do cultures of scholarship effect the culture of the classroom? Are the two cultures more intimately linked than one might first think? Might the culture of one inhibit the growth of the other? 

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